Rachel

I had no frickin’ clue what I wanted to be when I “grew up”. I bounced ideas round including vet, architect, doctor, teacher but nothing ever stuck. I was a pretty good student but never found anything that particularly stood out to me as something I wanted to dedicate my life’s work to.

During my years at the University of Southampton I was always very aware that my English degree was unlikely to be enough to land me the job after graduation. I also didn’t know what the job was going to be.

It has been through my accidental life choices and gambles that, at the age of 27, I have stumbled upon something that I truly believe in working towards and, without blowing my own trumpet, I’m pretty good at. That thing is helping others navigate the life choices we’re expected to make between the ages 14 and 25 that have the potential to set the entire trajectory of our lives.

At uni I was elected as Humanities Faculty Officer. During my time in this role I pushed forward employability as a key issue for my fellow students and I, maximising and improving the support given to students in preparing them for the world of work.

After graduation I then worked for The Scout Association for four years. In this time I provided non-formal education opportunities to thousands of young people between the ages of 14 and 25, helping them to develop a range of transferable skills from teamwork, leadership and self-confidence to communication, independence and innovative thinking.

I have now joined Goldsmiths University as an Employability Officer specifically looking after the Higher Education Achievement Report programme which champions the importance of co-curricular activities and experience alongside academic work to improve students’ chances of landing the job they want after they graduate.

I am also a Progression Mentor with the Princes Trust in which I provide 1-2-1 guidance to young people who are figuring out what they want their next steps to be from further education or training, employment or volunteering.

So that’s me – just starting out in the world of adulthood myself, I’m falling down the pitfalls of life and writing about them, so you don’t have to.

Cat

I had no frickin’ clue what I wanted to be when I “grew up”. I bounced ideas round including vet, architect, doctor, teacher but nothing ever stuck. I was a pretty good student but never found anything that particularly stood out to me as something I wanted to dedicate my life’s work to.

During my years at the University of Southampton I was always very aware that my English degree was unlikely to be enough to land me the job after graduation. I also didn’t know what the job was going to be.

It has been through my accidental life choices and gambles that, at the age of 27, I have stumbled upon something that I truly believe in working towards and, without blowing my own trumpet, I’m pretty good at. That thing is helping others navigate the life choices we’re expected to make between the ages 14 and 25 that have the potential to set the entire trajectory of our lives.

At uni I was elected as Humanities Faculty Officer. During my time in this role I pushed forward employability as a key issue for my fellow students and I, maximising and improving the support given to students in preparing them for the world of work.

After graduation I then worked for The Scout Association for four years. In this time I provided non-formal education opportunities to thousands of young people between the ages of 14 and 25, helping them to develop a range of transferable skills from teamwork, leadership and self-confidence to communication, independence and innovative thinking.

I have now joined Goldsmiths University as an Employability Officer specifically looking after the Higher Education Achievement Report programme which champions the importance of co-curricular activities and experience alongside academic work to improve students’ chances of landing the job they want after they graduate.

I am also a Progression Mentor with the Princes Trust in which I provide 1-2-1 guidance to young people who are figuring out what they want their next steps to be from further education or training, employment or volunteering.

So that’s me – just starting out in the world of adulthood myself, I’m falling down the pitfalls of life and writing about them, so you don’t have to.